Beach landscapes have long been associated with the Pacific, but the waters of the Great Barrier Reef are now being invaded by more and more marine life.

Now a new species of algae, called ‘bikinis’, is transforming the once pristine landscape.

A team of researchers from the University of Queensland and the National University of Singapore found that the ‘bumblebee’ is rapidly transforming the water of the iconic coral reefs of Queensland.

A research team led by Dr Helen Dutton from the Queensland University of Technology has identified a ‘bimbo’ (Eublae spp.) that feeds on coral reefs and that is now the fastest-growing species on the Great Blue Herons.

Bimbo algae is a new type of algae that grows on the edges of reefs and other marine organisms, such as sea stars, which have already been affected by the changing water quality.

The ‘bumbles’ can be seen in a number of different colours on the reef, and the algae can grow to enormous size.

“The algae is rapidly replacing the coral reefs,” Dr Dutton told The Age.

“We have a new kind of algae growing on the edge of the reef that is rapidly eating up the coral, and they are not just a new algae, they are really different from anything else.”

Dr Docket says this new species is also rapidly spreading to other reefs.

The scientists found that this new type can survive in conditions that were previously too salty for this kind of growth. “

These are the first time we have seen this type of an algae growing outside of Australia.”

The scientists found that this new type can survive in conditions that were previously too salty for this kind of growth.

“Our research suggests that it is already spreading outside of the coral reef,” Dr. Dutton said.

“It could have consequences for the whole coral reef system.” “

It is not just the bimbo, it is also these other species of corals that are also going to be affected by this new growth.”

“It could have consequences for the whole coral reef system.”

The research was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

“There’s a lot of work being done in Australia about the effects of climate change on coral reef systems, but there’s been very little information about the impact of this type growth on the corals,” Dr David Farrar, from the Australian Marine Science Centre at the University